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  • Meet Caroline

    A few things you should know about me...I am passionate about creating wedding photos that are natural, romantic and timeless. My approach to portrait time is to create timeless imagery that captures you two and your unique love in an honest, but gorgeously composed way that looks almost candid. Not a model? No problem! I believe it's a photographer's job, not yours to help you look and feel comfortable in front of the camera! I work in both medium format film and some digital. Film because of its beautiful, soft, fine art qualities and perfect skin tones, and digital because of it's reliability in low light situations.

    In my spare time I read, write poetry, music and mentor other women. Brunch is my favorite meal of the day and my drink of choice is a French 75.

    But enough about me... I look forward to hearing more about you and your wedding plans!

Oheka Castle Wedding | Long Island New York Wedding Photographer

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Oheka Castle Wedding Photographer
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Oheka Castle Wedding Photographer
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macedonian bread dance
macedonian bread dance
macedonian bread dance
new york long island wedding photographer
new york long island wedding photographer

If you are looking for a place to get married near New York City, Oheka Castle will give you the most stunning wedding photos you ever dreamed of.  This gorgeous French-style chateau, built by a Gastby-esque playboy in the Gilded Age,  is the second-largest private residence ever built in America.  Today, it is every New York bride’s dream venue, and a huge magnet for movies, TV shows, magazine photoshoots and celebrity weddings.   Tara and Adam chose this romantic, dream of a venue to be the backdrop for their wedding day celebration.

Tara and Adam’s wedding was full of many personal and creative details envisioned and executed by the super talented wedding planners and florists at Cheeky Details.  Anything your heart could have desired was there: cigar rollers, a photobooth, ice sculptures, fireworks, a decadent dessert bar and the largest cake I’ve ever seen in my life.   The Cheeky Details ladies even created  a gorgeous “Toss Bar” in an antique piece of furniture where guests could fill up bags of different flowers and petals to toss at the bride and groom.

Scattered rain that morning, added some mild drama to their day, but didn’t prevent any of the wedding festivities from taking place as originally planned.  Towards the end of the ceremony, dark clouds rolled in creating a beautifully dramatic sky, and a few drops began to fall right as rings were being exchanged.   Oheka Castle’s amazing staff rushed out with umbrellas for everyone without interrupting the ceremony, and Tara and Adam were able to finish their first kiss and recessional before the downpour.

My favorite part of the wedding day was the Macedonian bread dance.   After a traditional group dance lead by a man holding a loaf of bread in turn over each family member’s head  (this is supposed to represent fertility),  the couple pulls on each half of the bread.  “Whoever gets the larger half,” it was announced, “wears the pants in the family.”   Obviously the battle for that title was fierce!

Adam and Tara are a relaxed, easy-going couple whose number one priority on their wedding day was to have fun.   And as you can see, that they certainly did!  Both of them were on the dance floor all night surrounded by their friends and family, enjoying their fabulous band Kinky Spigot and the Welders.

Thank you Mekina and Julieanne for all your assistance in helping me create and capture amazing lasting memories for Tara and Adam!

Oheka Castle Wedding Photographer: Caroline Frost Photography | Event Planning, Design Concept and Floral Design: Cheeky Details | Invitation and Day of Stationery: Jessica Leigh Paperie | Table linens and Napkins: The Finishing Touch | Ceremony/Cocktail/Reception Musicians: Kinky Spigot and the Welders | Firework Display: Fireworks by Grucci | Trumpet Players: Royal Brass | Cigar Roller: La Casa Grande Cigars | Photo Booth: Caroline Frost Photography | Lighting: Ambient Events | Dress: Jenny Packham | Tuxedo: After Six (Bonaventure Tuxedo)

Julieanne - June 13, 2014 - 5:47 pm

Beautiful work!!

Amy Rizzuto - June 13, 2014 - 10:57 pm

This is gorgeous Caroline! I am in love with this wedding…captured so beautifully.

Michelle Clemente-Lange - June 14, 2014 - 3:14 pm

Such an elegant wedding Caroline! Im dying over that flower girls & firework photo. So magical.

Why I Use Film | New York Film Wedding Photographer

Film vs digital has been a debate since digital cameras were invented.  In the beginning, the resistance was to digital wedding photography and that was mostly just the prototypical old-timers being uncomfortable with change.   However,  film is making a comeback for fine art wedding photographers and now the old-timers are those who are swearing by their digital cameras and the crazy lighting effects they can do with them, while others of us are looking for something fresh,  natural, and more fine art.

That’s why I started photographing weddings in film.   Digital is easier, cheaper, and more convenient no doubt.  And yes there are loads of Photoshop presets you can buy to help imitate the look of film.    But none of them can give you lovely soft bokeh or the fine grain that to me looks more like tiny soft brush strokes than “grain.”   I started playing around with film because the look fit fit my brand.  I’ve always wanted my couple to leave with images from their wedding that feel like art: authentic yet artistic, images that might belong on a gallery wall.  Something that invites you to stay and stare for longer than just to register what’s happening in the picture.   Film images do that.   The texture, the softness, the tangibility invites you to stay, evokes you to feel, provokes you even to want to touch the physical print, something that we all lose in our digital world.

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Top (Film) Bottom (Digital edited with film preset)

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In these two photos above, pay attention to the circles of light above their heads.  In the left one (digital image edited with a film preset) the circles, called bokeh, have hard lines where as in the right image (film no editing) the bokeh is softer and overlaps.  Also look at the out of focus grass on either side.  In the left image the grass just looks like out of focus green while in the right image the fine grain gives the background texture like tiny brush strokes.

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film vs digital

Top Image (Film no editing) Bottom Image (Digital edited extensively to bring back the skyline and with a film preset)  It’s an easy mistake to compare the colors when comparing film and digital images, but film just like digital can be developed in all kinds of different ways to achieve different color.   Instead, look at the difference in the softness of her skin.  Every shadow and line is visible in the digital image while in the film image her skin looks softer and the light is more even.   I also love the way hair looks on film.  In the film image her hair looks soft and touchable almost like thin brush strokes painted on by a master artist.

When photographing in  digital you have to expose for the highlights (or they will blow out – meaning turn white) so it results in the skin having to be darker, and shadows under eyes and elsewhere on the face become are prominent.  In film, I can expose so those shadows get washed out and still retain the important highlights in the background (in this case, the skyline).   You can see the same kinds of differences in skin in all these sample images.

new york film wedding photographer

new york film wedding photographer

Top (Digital edited with film presets and highlights brought back) Bottom (Film no editing)   Here again you may notice less shadows in her skin and the nice texture film gives to hair.  Also notice the sky.   Film is able to pick up much more of the sky while film blows out the details of the storm cloud and even with extensive editing it can hardly be brought back.

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Left (Film with no editing) Right (Digital with film preset)  I made the digital image as bright as I could without blowing out the highlights on her skin, but the shadows under her eyes and around her mouth didn’t soften even close to how much they did naturally with film.

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film vs digital
Above (Film) Below (Digital edited with film preset)   Again on the subject of the sky and highlights, the film image retains more of the integrity of the building in the background.  Also you don’t get nearly as much chromatic aberration (the purple color you see from the back-light in the willow tree).   I also think the top image has a marvelous texture.  If you look closely at the willow tree leaves it looks like each one is painted on while in the digital image they all sort of blend together in a blurry mess.
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Above left (digital) above right (film) Film also gives more flexibility with where and when you can shoot.   While the legendary “golden hour” (what photographers call the hour before and after sunset) is still the best time of day for portraits, wedding schedules often don’t allow you to plan photos around the best light.  When this happens, film is your best friend (if it wasn’t already).   Film takes in more information, retains more of the highlights, and yet the light stays soft.    Presets can’t help you here because they won’t change the difference of how film and digital sensors react to light.  This was a really difficult lighting situation we came across at a recent wedding.  It was bright and sunny and the majority of portraits were scheduled for midday.  There was no shade to be found.  This is not ideal lighting.  So in digital, you can see there is quite a bit of contrast between the shadows on their face and the background. In film you can see the image retains a softness and the contrast between the highlights and shadows is minimal.
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Left (Digital with extensive editing and film preset) Right (Film) These were also taken in really bright conditions.
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Left (Digital with extensive editing and film preset) Right (Film)  The soft grain of film also means that the out of focus parts of any given image look… how to describe it?  Buttery and delicious!  With digital it just looks out of focus.  Both images were taken at F/2.0

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Left (Film) Right (Digital with film preset)  No matter how good the preset, you can never quite match the buttery soft texture of film.   Both of these were shot at F2.0 but the film image gives us such a softer background and consequently the couple stands out from the background more and the photo looks cleaner.

film vs digital
I think both of these images look nice, they were both taken right before sunset, the ideal time for gorgeous back-lit portraits.  However, you can see on the right her skin looks much softer and any lines on her face or shadows under her eyes (we all have them!) are almost indiscernible.  Both images were taken at F/2.0    Left (Digital with  film preset) Right (Film)]

Film FAQs

What brides and grooms can really tell the difference between digital and film?

I know all this stuff gets really nitty-gritty and you may ask, “What client will really notice all those little details?”  Your brides and grooms may not be able to point out exactly why they like one photo over another,  but I’ve seen it time and time again that my film photos just jump out to my clients more.  It seems to be a growing preference.  Style Me Pretty posts a very high percentage of weddings photographed in film and their book which they selected a few favorite weddings for,  is full of mostly weddings photographed in films.  If you look at Pinterest boards, you’ll see most brides have their wedding board covered in film images (usually without even knowing it).   I’ve heard my clients say they like the “texture” or the “timelessness” of a film images, but ultimately what I hear the most is that my clients like the way film images make them feel.  Ultimately as a wedding photographer you have to choose the medium that works best for you and your brand.  My brand is “Natural, Romantic, and Timeless Wedding Photography” and film is a part of my formula for achieving that kind of look.

Do you use still use digital at all?

Please, do not take this article to mean I am anti-digital photography.  I really do believe digital images have their place.  Digital cameras work really well for me during receptions or dark church weddings where things are really fast-paced and where black and white would be the only solution for film.   Also, film cameras like the medium format Contax 645 that I use are often older and therefore a bit more sensitive to things like weather.  It’s good to always have a digital camera (or in my case, two) as a back up.

How do you get film pictures online? Do the Bride and Groom still get digital files?

My lab offers film scanning which allows me to get extremely high quality digital renderings of all of my photos.  All of my wedding collections include the digital files.

What type of film do you use?

I predominantly use Fuji 400h and Portra 800.

Where do you get your film developed?

Because I want to provide my clients with a luxury experience and  luxury products, I use the best of the best to develop my film.   Richard Photo Lab in California develops all my film a long with many of the other best wedding photographer’s in the world.

Enjoyed this article? Want tips on selecting a New York Wedding Photographer?

Bethany Michaela Jones - June 2, 2014 - 4:55 pm

I LOVE this post. It’s my favorite one to date! Bravo.

Chantale Zoe - June 2, 2014 - 8:02 pm

This is such a fantastic and knowledgable post! Thank you so much for sharing this. I have an awesome Nikon camera that my dad bought me ages ago, and I have been debating about using it it again. Thank you confirming that I should. xo

Lily Belle - June 3, 2014 - 12:17 am

Wow. I never would have noticed the difference. There really is a spectacular aura (perhaps not the right word) with the photographs taken with film. I think I’m a changed woman!

Allison Mannella - June 3, 2014 - 6:00 pm

Wonderful post – I could look at film vs. digital all day long! I too am totally in love with film. Keep up the beautiful work!

[…] session was capture in all medium format film by New York Film Photographer Caroline […]

Boris Simović - September 26, 2014 - 9:42 pm

Regarding bokeh and “texture” you see on film, I think this is more about the format size than film vs. digital. Are you shooting 35mm digitial? Because if you shooting film with Contax 645, which is medium format, your captures are about twice as big as the 35mm format, so you’re able to separate your subjects from the background more (and the transitions are smoother). You’re also using different lenses, hence their different signatures and different “textures”. If you used digital medium format (something like Phase One P65+, IQ160, IQ260; Hasselblad H4D-60, H5D-60; or Leaf Credo 60), those differences would be gone.

Moo Jae - September 2, 2015 - 11:29 pm

Nice comparison between digital and film. I also like shooting in film. However, there are photos that can be great in digital than film. It’s a matter of knowing. Some clients would want to see their photos unedited. It’s also knowing what the client wants.
Nice article! Keep it up!
Just dropping by,
Moo Jae
http://ollistudio.com/

Delamar Hotel Wedding | Connecticut Wedding Photographer

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Remember this adorable fancy feast commercial where the guy proposes with a  ring around the cat’s neck?  Well, Fancy Feast might as well have stole that idea from Scott who knew just how to charm Kate, his fellow cat-loving-girlfriend.  On a weekday in the summer of 2012, Scott snuck home in the middle of the day to lay out roses and cake and champagne and tied the ring to their first cat’s neck.

Their wedding was as beautiful, romantic and uniquely-them as the proposal!  Though they got married in early April, it may as well have been the first day of summer.   Clear blue skies and 80 degree weather,  with no leaves still on the trees, gave portraits a little extra challenge, but it was nothing that film couldn’t handle!   I love working with film and its flexibility in all kinds of light.  Despite how harsh the light was in reality, the images still come out soft and romantic.  I love that Kate and Scott chose to do a first look which made the day so much more relaxing for them, as we were able to get all the must-have portraits and family pictures out of the way before the ceremony and they were able to enjoy their cocktail hour.  Kate and Scott also left 10 minutes for sunset pictures during their reception, so we were able to get them some more gorgeous portraits in the soft golden light.

Not only did these two work tirelessly to pull together a gorgeous pink and white wedding full of  unique vintage and DIY details, but once everything was in place this bride and groom had no trouble having fun at their own wedding.   Their ceremony was full of joy and lots of laughter, their cocktail reception was fun and had lots of tasty appetizers and unique cocktails like Starfruit Fizz.  With how small their reception was, I hardly expected the dance floor to be filled to overflowing all night, but this crowd knew how to have a good time!  Kate and Scott danced all night surrounded by their closest family and friends.

All images by New York and Connecticut Wedding Photographer Caroline Frost

 

Jessica Miccio - May 23, 2014 - 12:37 pm

SO BEAUTIFUL! obsessed with the ring shot!

Lily Belle - May 23, 2014 - 4:03 pm

I love the overhead shot of the couple on the couch. Beautifully done again, Care!

Michelle - May 27, 2014 - 4:04 pm

Stunning Caroline! Such a beautiful wedding!

Allison - November 1, 2014 - 6:51 pm

Love her gown as well as the maids’ dresses! So pretty and feminine. Do you know the designers??

New York Cherry Blossoms | Central Park Engagement

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I have a little problem and I’m soon to seek clinical help.   I can’t seem to come across cherry blossoms or any other flowering tree this spring without wanting to photograph it for hours on end.  Cherry blossoms, magnolias and dogwood trees have sprung to life all over New York City and after a long, dreary winter I imagine they are to a wedding photographer what water is for a thirsty desert traveler.   The problem with these beautiful blossoms is they don’t often last more than a week, and that’s only if the rain and wind are kind.   On a run through Central Park, I saw these gorgeous trees and with  no engagement photos booked in the park that week I called my dear friends Mark and Mara who are getting married this September,  to see if they wanted an engagement photo session amongst Central Park’s cherry blossoms.   I brought my Contax and photographed the lovely couple in all film.  God smiled on us and gave us the warmest, buttery, sunset sunlight that I’ve ever seen on this coast.  I’m in love with every image from this shoot and can’t wait to photograph Mark and Mara’s New York wedding at Tralee Farm!

Shang - May 9, 2014 - 10:30 pm

Gorgeous photos of an amazing couple!

Denver Engagement Photographer - May 10, 2014 - 2:36 pm

O man those cherry blossoms are gorgeous! Great shots!

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